Seeing Jesus Come to Life in People (Testimony and Song)

I simply want to share the joy  which is in my heart right now.  I am teaching in a few small groups within my church.  I am sharing with the people in these groups the story of Jesus.  I am sharing with them how messed up things got with Adam’s fall, and how all the good things which happened after that weren’t enough for us, and that we needed something more than the gift of Moses.

This week I was leading the group through many passages which underline the mess we were in and we very clearly saw that we were not able to fix this, nor was the law of Moses enough for us.  And I was able to share with them that it is only through the loving kindness of God in the work of Jesus Christ that we are lifted from the way of the wicked to the way of the just.

Having people read the Scriptures together and highlighting these very poignant passages,  then teaching about salvation in Christ, all of this brings deep deep joy to me.  It’s what I was made to do.

There is one student in particular who stands out.  There’s not a lot of church background, but a sort of familiarity with the story of Jesus.  At the end of our time together she said “I am really enjoying our time together, because I am finally understanding the Bible.”  What joy in me!  And she is really grasping the Gospel of Jesus!

Here is a song which grasps the teaching I’ve been giving in these days.  I am rejoicing while listening and praying with this song, that Jesus is bringing this reality into peoples’ lives in these days.  What precious joy!

Epiphany: God made manifest

Epiphany is a marvelous and rich feast. Delightfully, that richness lingers throughout this whole last week of the Christmas season as we approach the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord. We see embers of that richness reflected in the prayers offered in the Church’s liturgy and in the readings proclaimed from Sacred Scripture. We hear declarations of the Kingship of Christ, manifestations of His marvelous glory, and his longing to claim His Bride.

Today the Bridegroom claims his bride, the Church, since Christ has washed her sins away in Jordan’s waters; the Magi hasten with their gifts to the royal wedding; and the wedding guests rejoice, for Christ has changed water into wine, alleluia. (Morning Prayer Antiphon)

God himself has taken on our human flesh in the Incarnation, but lest we forget in our gazing upon a sweet infant babe, the ensuing feasts quickly remind us that this sweet babe in the arms of Mary is the all-powerful King of the Universe who has broken into our world to bring light into dark places, to set captives free, and to draw not just a chosen few, but ALL, to himself.

Rise up in splendor, Jerusalem! Your light has come, the glory of the Lord shines upon you. See, darkness covers the earth, and thick clouds cover the peoples; but upon you the LORD shines, and over you appears his glory. Nations shall walk by your light, and kings by your shining radiance. Raise your eyes and look about; they all gather and come to you… Then you shall be radiant at what you see, your heart shall throb and overflow, for the riches of the sea shall be emptied out before you, the wealth of nations shall be brought to you. (Isaiah 60:1-5)

In the early hours of Sunday morning the song God With Us by All Sons and Daughters began running through my mind. It is my Epiphany theme song! He has come to be so near to us; He is God with us. Come, stand in His glory; know His peace, hope, and light. And come as the Magi did, no matter how far you must travel, to lay all you are and all you have at His feet, even your costliest treasures. For you shall be radiant at what you see in this great king who comes to take you as His bride, and your heart shall overflow with more joy than you can imagine when His light floods your heart.

Prisoner 16670

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In 1941 a Polish priest was arrested at his friary. The Nazis noticed his German name and offered to let him go. Wishing to be with his native people, the priest insisted on going with all the others who were arrested. After a brief stop in one of the smaller concentration camps, he was transferred to Auschwitz, where he was given the number 16670.

Though he was rather sickly and frail, the guards gave him some of the hardest work. Still, he persevered, always trusting in the love of Jesus and Mary. One day, some men were discovered to have escaped from camp. Of course, this infuriated the camp commander, so he decided to pick ten random prisoners to starve in a bunker as a way to deter any further escape attempts. Prisoner 16670 was not chosen. The final prisoner chosen, a man by the name of Franciszek Gajowniczek, begged for mercy from the guards because of his wife and children. Prisoner 16670 stepped forward, announced he was a Catholic priest, and volunteered to take the man’s spot. St. Maximilian Kolbe, who could have escaped imprisonment due to his German name, sacrificed his life so the other prisoner could have a chance to survive and return to his family! What love this priest of Jesus Christ had for God’s children!

In the bunker, there could be heard hymns sung and prayers recited to our Lord and His Mother. There were not cries of pain and anguish, but instead songs of joy and peace. St. Maximilian encouraged his fellow victims that soon they would be in Heaven with Jesus and His Mother Mary. Two weeks passed and still St. Maximilian remained alive, so the guards finally gave him a lethal injection.

As for Franciszek, he survived Auschwitz and reunited with his wife after the war (though his sons were killed). He was present at the canonization of St. Maximilian and spread the story of St. Maximilian’s heroic love as long as he lived.

Let’s strive to imitate the heroic virtue of St. Maximilian Kolbe! We will put others’ needs before our own. We will go where we can best serve the Lord and bring about His glory, even if it means a little extra suffering for us. We will encourage one another in times of extreme suffering so that we might not cry in pain and anguish, but instead sing out to the Lord in joy and peace. Perhaps we may even lay down our own lives so that others may live.

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“For Jesus Christ, I am prepared to suffer still more.”

Build the Fire [SERMON]

Listen to Deacon Bryan’s sermon from Sunday, August 3rd. Check out some important readings from Mass:

Romans 8:35, 37-39

Brothers and sisters:
What will separate us from the love of Christ?
Will anguish, or distress, or persecution, or famine,
or nakedness, or peril, or the sword?
No, in all these things we conquer overwhelmingly
through him who loved us.
For I am convinced that neither death, nor life,
nor angels, nor principalities,
nor present things, nor future things,
nor powers, nor height, nor depth,
nor any other creature will be able to separate us
from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Matthew 14:13-21

When Jesus heard of the death of John the Baptist,
he withdrew in a boat to a deserted place by himself.
The crowds heard of this and followed him on foot from their towns.
When he disembarked and saw the vast crowd,
his heart was moved with pity for them, and he cured their sick.
When it was evening, the disciples approached him and said,
“This is a deserted place and it is already late;
dismiss the crowds so that they can go to the villages
and buy food for themselves.”
Jesus said to them, “There is no need for them to go away;
give them some food yourselves.”
But they said to him,
“Five loaves and two fish are all we have here.”
Then he said, “Bring them here to me, ”
and he ordered the crowds to sit down on the grass.
Taking the five loaves and the two fish, and looking up to heaven,
he said the blessing, broke the loaves,
and gave them to the disciples,
who in turn gave them to the crowds.
They all ate and were satisfied,
and they picked up the fragments left over—
twelve wicker baskets full.
Those who ate were about five thousand men,
not counting women and children.

Psalm Response (Ps. 145: 16):

The hand of the Lord feeds us; he answers all our needs.

What is Simplicity?

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I’ve written in previous posts about simplicity and how it can assist us in remembering our mission to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ, but I didn’t really offer a definition of simplicity. It’s a tough word to define, especially when seeking to satisfy the masses. I’ve had several conversations with the EvangelicalDisciple concerning the topic and we have yet to nail down a good definition of it. Well, I have good news for everyone: I think I have found a good definition!

St. Francis de Sales (whom I quoted last week) offers this:

Well, simplicity is nothing else than an act of pure and simple charity, having only one end, which is to acquire the love of God; and our soul is simple when we have no other aim in all that we do or desire.

To break open his definition, he brings into the discussion the example of Martha and Mary as they welcomed the Lord into their home. Mary was the one who understood simplicity, for she looked straight to God, without ever allowing any self-interest to creep into her motives for sitting at the feet of Jesus. Martha, meanwhile, was so focused on herself that she became anxious and weighed down by her work. Her life had become so self-interested that she lost all freedom to rest with Jesus.

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Consider the ramifications of what life might look like for one devoted to living a life solely founded on the virtue of simplicity: no more little indulgences after consuming enough food and drink, no more excessive TV watching, spending, hoarding… no more excess at all. What else might it entail? Well, resting on Sundays, spending more time in the peace and quiet of prayer, striving for holiness and inviting others to do the same, encountering great joy in detachment from self, realizing you don’t have to defeat Satan because Jesus already did it, calmness of spirit and freedom from anxiety. The pros outweigh the cons.

If you’re interested in living a life of true simplicity, ask yourself:

Do I want serve this person because I want to look good in the eyes of others, or because I want to show him/her God’s love?

Do I want to buy this car because it looks a certain way, or because it will help me glorify God?

Do I want to grow a good garden so I can show it off to my friends, or because a good garden will nourish me and remind me to thank God for my health, and beautiful flowers will remind me of all that God created?

Do I exercise only because it makes me look better to other people, or because I can serve God better with a healthy body?

Do I want to fast today because my friends might notice and think I’m a holy person, or because it will remind me of my soul’s hunger for God’s grace?

Am I focused on myself, or on God and his glory?

Do I think only of myself and how I look in the eyes of others, or do I think only of God and his love for his people?

Do I pray only because it makes me feel good, or because God deserves my worship, reverence, and love? Do I stop praying when the good feelings vanish, or do I persevere even through the times when I can’t feel God’s presence?

Ask yourself these questions – and similar questions about things that better relate to your life – frequently. Live a reflected life so you don’t lose sight of the ultimate goal, which is the glory of God and the salvation of souls. Be simple.

Days of Grace

posted by: zealoussheep

We are blessed to be immersed in immense days of grace. First, we have been invited to peer into the wounded side of Our Savior and journey the path of the soldier’s lance and so find that most beautiful Heart pierced for love of us.17c10aad06c2615dcc8551edd2d8e492

Then we behold Our Mother, whose Immaculate Heart is a mirror of all the virtues. A heart full of light and beauty reflecting the radiance of the Sacred Heart.
Doves and the Heart of Mary

Finally, rounding out a tremendous trifecta, we honor the Princes of Apostles, Peter and Paul, among the foremost witnesses of the Faith.
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Exactly four years ago today, I boarded a plane to depart the Eternal City and return to America. There I spent a year face to face with these princes, confronted concretely with the places and circumstances of their deaths, and with their passion, zeal, and sacrifice. Standing in the places where they shed their blood, I recognized anew the voice of my Savior and theirs calling me to the same: Lay down your life. For love of ME give it all.

Martyrdom, the shedding of one’s blood, is a literal manifestation of giving it all. We may not all be called to die a martyr’s death, but we are called to lay all that we have, are, and will be, before the throne of our King and God and give him all, each and every day.

How are you living? Are you ready to shed your blood? Every Christian disciple should aspire to be brave enough to do so. St. John Paul II said,

If something is not worth dying for, it’s not worth living for.

Is our faith something worth dying for, really living for? Is our living a shining witness of readiness to give it all? Of having interiorly surrendered everything, fully uniting our will to HIS?

May these days of grace be an occasion to gaze upon that burning, pierced, enflamed Sacred Heart. To gaze upon that pure, holy, fragrant, sword skewered Immaculate Heart. To look into those fierce, courageous eyes of those martyred princes. May these days fortify you. May they call you on to greatness. May they inspire you to follow our Savior, our Mother and Saints Peter and Paul in generously pouring out your life. May your offering yield for the world an increasingly confident, joyful, courageous Catholic witness that begins right now in your heart enflamed by love.

 

 

 

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